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Name
Caitlyn Vlasschaert

Sun, 09/20/2020 - 18:15

Thank you everyone– especially Dr. Joneja and Matthew– for bringing this topic to the forefront of our minds. Something that stood out to me during the Q&A period was a comment about how the onus of explaining how to "do better" should not be placed on the individuals who face systemic racism & bias. As explained in a lay press article: "Experiencing racism in your day-to-day life has a heavy and accumulative impact on your social, mental and emotional wellbeing. But what is less frequently discussed is the damaging psychological impact of constantly having to explain what racism is – or why something is racist. Whether it’s through the ignorance of employers or colleagues, well-meaning questions from friends, or belligerent demands for proof when trying to articulate an example of injustice – people of colour are frequently used as some kind of racism reference database." (https://bit.ly/3ciZDex).

Twitter has provided a means for me to listen to the narratives of BIPOC individuals who have chosen to publicly share their experiences, and also to read about work being done at other centres to address racist infrastructures. For example, a medical student recently Tweeted about an instance of overt racism she experienced, asking for "tips on coping with this stuff" (https://bit.ly/2ZPiN71). She received over 500 responses, including messages of solidarity and advice. Through this medium, I have learned from many voices. Accounts I play particular attention to include those of Dr. Kimberly Manning (@gradydoctor), Dr. Uché Blackstock (@uche_blackstock) and Dr. Qaali Hussein (@QaaliHussein1).

Name
Caitlyn Vlasschaert

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