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Name
Fred Laflamme

Fri, 02/07/2014 - 03:56

Good day Stephen! I'm sitting in a nail salon in San Diego waiting for Mary and just read your intro. The actual report will have to wait until later today when I'm more comfortably ensconced in front of my Mac but thought in the meantime I'd offer this brief comment. Thirty eight years in the consumer magazine and newspaper publishing business taught me one lesson over and over again. The medium wasn't as crucial as the audience and what was said never seemed to be as important as how it was said. Newspapers were supposed to herald the end of clothes line chatter, Radio was supposed to signal the doom of newspapers, TV was going to destroy radio and internet was to end the reign of TV. While it's true we don't sit around the big old radio on Saturday nights listening to foster Hewitt like we once did, radio reinvented itself with the rise of the automobile and radio has never had larger audiences thanks in part to better signals, electronics and most of all variety, accompanied by breadth and depth. In other words content presented in an engaging manner. Newspapers are having to reinvent themselves much like radio but they are first and foremost content providers and once they find ways to profitably deliver that message through the appropriate medium they too will enjoy a resurgence provided the content and how it is presented resonates with their intended audiences. As an editor of some merit once advised a young publisher about to write his first column, "remember the first rule of writing; never ever bore your audience" If the annual report proves to be as entertaining, engrossing and informative as all your blogs, the medium won't matter in the final analysis but what you have to say and how you said it will. Make it great and your audience will read it on painted rocks if necessary! I'm looking forward to reading! Hope all's we'll and hugs to Kathie and Anya! Best, Fred

Name
Fred Laflamme
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