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Name
Jessica

Mon, 02/03/2020 - 20:37

Thank you Edwin for your excellent summary of our rounds and visit with you. It's heartening to see our key messages captured in your report and that they resonated with you. I was so impressed by your colleagues in the translational medicine program and your insights. I do agree with Madison that there are communication skills taught within the serious illness care program that are broadly applicable within the practice of medicine. Fortunately both the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada do emphasize communication competencies in their training programs. A number of approaches are already routinely taught that go by the acronyms like "SPIKES" and "FIFE," along with others like "Dignity conserving care" and the "Calgary-Cambridge communication guide to the medical interview". These frameworks help clinicians share bad news, explore emotions or elicit concerns or obtain medical histories. The Serious Illness Care Program complements and builds on the communication skills acquired from these other approaches, by providing patient tested language and a sequence of questions that help clinicians elicit patients own priorities and concerns related to living with serious or life-limiting illnesses. We are now offering the training workshop to all family medicine and internal medicine trainees and I think if the evidence for the SICP in practice continues to show benefits it may well become a future routine part of medical training.

Name
Jessica

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