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Residency

Residency

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Cardiology Residency

Nephrology is the subspecialty of Internal Medicine that is primarily concerned with diseases of the kidney.  The Nephrology program at Queen’s University is a two-year residency program that prepares its trainees for independent practice as consultant nephrologists.  Residents graduate with in-depth and demonstrable skills in all aspects of nephrology (also known as renal medicine), and a working knowledge of the basic and applied sciences relevant to kidney disease and treatment.

The curriculum is offered over thirteen four-week blocks each year.  In the first year of the program, residents are provided with a broad range of experience in the various aspects of general nephrology.  The year includes four Ambulatory Clinic rotations covering peritoneal dialysis, transplantation, and chronic kidney disease, in addition to two Hemodialysis rotations.  

The ward and consult rotations in the first year offer experience in acute management of nephrology patients, emergency care and emergency procedures such as biopsy, plasma exchange, dialysis initiation (peritoneal, hemodialysis, or continuous hemodialysis) and placement of hemodialysis catheters, both permanent and temporary.  Residents function at a junior consultant level, but receive considerable one-on-one interaction with the faculty.  They are expected to see all patients first, or review patients seen by ward residents first, and then present their management plan to faculty. 

A longitudinal general nephrology clinic runs continuously throughout the year and enables residents to make all clinical decisions on patients they see, with input from staff.  They are also responsible for on-going follow up.  Residents function at a junior consultant level, and receive considerable one-on-one interaction with the faculty. 

In the second year of the program, residents consolidate their skills in general nephrology.  They also pursue a variety of subspecialty experiences designed to allow a more in-depth exploration of special areas of nephrology and the associated services that are utilized in nephrology practice. 

Residents attend compulsory teaching sessions in Renal Pathology, in addition to further ambulatory clinics and ward/consult rotations.  There is an increased level of responsibility and residents function as Junior Attendings.

The curriculum in the second year is deliberately flexible so that residents can pursue areas of specific interest and enhance their future career opportunities. 

Residents have the option to pursue a number of local and off-site electives including Pediatric Nephrology, Urology, Radiology, Pathology, and Renal Transplantation. 

Admission to the Nephrology program at Queen's University is through the Medicine Subspecialty Match, coordinated by the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS).

In the past, interviews for Ontario Nephrology Training Programs have been coordinated so that they all occur in the same week, to try and decrease travel costs for prospective applicants. Applicants will be notified by email the date, time and location of their interview. The interviews are done in 2 parts with the applicant interviewing with 1 or 2 members of the nephrology division and then a separate meeting with the Program Director. A tour of the hospital is also arranged and opportunity to meet the current nephrology trainees arranged.

All residents attend weekly academic half-days.  These generally include presentations by faculty members, and residents also present on a regular basis. Nephrology Grand Rounds provide opportunities for cases to be presented.  During Pathology Rounds, residents attempt to interpret renal biopsy findings followed by discussions of case histories and relevant management issues.   The Division has been very successful in attracting both national and international nephrologists to speak at our rounds and speakers will often host separate teaching sessions for residents.  A bi-weekly Journal Club provides an opportunity for articles to be presented, critiqued, and discussed. 


Nephrology Grand Rounds (September to June)

Location: Renal Unit Conference Room BURR 3 Office Suite, (Room 21.3.035) 
Day/Time: Fridays from 12:00 to 13:00
Presenter/Topic: Please email R. Sobiesiak at sobiesr@queensu.ca for information

The Division of Nephrology is based at Kingston General Hospital (KGH), southeastern Ontario’s leading center for complex-acute and specialty care and home to the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario.  KGH serves almost 500,000 people through its Kingston facility and 24 regional affiliate and satellite sites. KGH was ranked in 2011 as one of Canada’s Top 40 Research Hospitals by Research Info source.

There is an extremely broad patient base at KGH, and the volume of clinical material enables residents to learn all aspects of adult nephrology.  Facilities and teaching are excellent, especially in dialysis.

Residents are able to participate in a variety of community and rural experiences.  CKD clinics occur in smaller communities like Belleville and Picton, and all residents are given the opportunity to travel to Moose Factory to deliver nephrology care for aboriginal populations in the James Bay region.   Nephrology residents have also had the opportunity to undertake international electives in locations as such as Tanzania and Australia.

The Division of Nephrology is based at Kingston General Hospital (KGH), southeastern Ontario’s leading center for complex-acute and specialty care and home to the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario.  KGH serves almost 500,000 people through its Kingston facility and 24 regional affiliate and satellite sites. KGH was ranked in 2011 as one of Canada’s Top 40 Research Hospitals by Research Info source.

There is an extremely broad patient base at KGH, and the volume of clinical material enables residents to learn all aspects of adult nephrology.  Facilities and teaching are excellent, especially in dialysis.

Residents are able to participate in a variety of community and rural experiences.  CKD clinics occur in smaller communities like Belleville and Picton, and all residents are given the opportunity to travel to Moose Factory to deliver nephrology care for aboriginal populations in the James Bay region.   Nephrology residents have also had the opportunity to undertake international electives in locations as such as Tanzania and Australia.

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